Sex dating in hopewell virginia

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[-----], hospital, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, in Louisa County, Virginia, to his wife, possibly in North Carolina, regarding his work in the 2nd Corps hospital in Louisa County, noting one patient with smallpox, and commenting that the overall number of sick in the hospital is down. Billie also comments on his duties and other military matters.

Letter, 2 January 1865, from a soldier named Billie at Petersburg, Virginia, to his sister Maggie describing the wintery weather conditions around Petersburg during the siege of 1864-1865.

Letter, 1862, from Lucen [-----] in Richmond, Virginia, to his father, regarding the high prices of clothing and shoes, and his work and pay as a clerk in the Medical Directors office in Richmond.

Contains descriptions of the number of soldiers aboard ship, the James River and the shoreline along the James River, food and living conditions aboard ship, and participation in military operations south of the James River between Petersburg and Richmond.

Letter, 6 November 1864, from Richard [-----], in the Officers' General Hospital Ward 2, near Fort Monroe, Virginia, to his wife Libby in Lynn, Massachusetts, discussing his stay in the hospital, other patients, his hope of receiving a leave of absence or of being transferred to a Massachusetts hospital, and his family.

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Thomas adds that the flotilla had captured other vessels on the Rappahannock River, and that Union troops, under General Irvin Mc Dowell had arrived in Fredericksburg. Letter, 26 February 1865, to James [-----] from Tait[? He also mentions the arrival of Mc Clellan's Army to reinforce General Pope's Army. Letter, 23 August 1862, from Judson [-----] at the Mansion House Hospital, Alexandria, Virginia, to Sarah, writing about his health, taking care of the wounded at the hospital, amputations, and his weariness of the war. He also discusses the removal of secessionists from Alexandria; Baltimore, Maryland; and Washington, D. Letter, 8 July 1863, from Charlie [-----], a Union soldier at Fort Scott, near Alexandria, Virginia, to Emma in Litchfield, Connecticut, discussing the celebration in camp during the 4th of July and for recent victories such as the capture of Vicksburg and Battle of Gettysburg.

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