Tetraflex accommodating

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The FDA approved the original version of Crystalens in 2003, at which time it was developed and marketed by a startup company called eyeonics.

Bausch Lomb acquired Crystalens in early 2008; and in June of that year, the FDA approved a “high-definition” version of Crystalens, which incorporates an optic designed for better near vision.

That is not enough to give patients good distance and near vision, although it may suffice for good distance and intermediate vision.

This design strategy trades off some of the benefits of seeing through a single zone in order to have a greater range of focus. While many multifocal patients can read without glasses, their distance vision may not be as sharp as it might be with a monofocal IOL.

Typically, the eye’s “focusing” or ciliary muscle powers the movement or shape change.

Currently approved accommodating designs cause less loss of contrast sensitivity and are less likely than multifocal IOLs to produce glare and halos.

(Toric designs correct astigmatism.) THE FAILED Synchrony (developed by Visiogen) was a mechanical accommodating IOL with two lenses that moved closer or farther apart to change focus.

When Abbott Medical Optics (AMO) acquired Visogen for 0 million in 2009, Synchrony had just received CE marking in Europe.

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